The 10 Best Hockey Sticks to Buy 2021

Hockey, Reviews

Very few things in life are better than throwing on a pair of skates, grabbing a puck, and sniping a shot bar down over the goalie’s glove.

A lot goes into creating that moment, but it’s all worth it as you celebrate that perfect shot from the hash or think back on the dangle in the neutral zone that created the scoring opportunity.

Of course, none of this is possible without a hockey stick, and selecting the perfect twig is an essential part of being a hockey player.

Here’s a look at some of the best hockey sticks on the market in 2021.

Factors to Consider When Buying Hockey Sticks

Before you can get on the ice or play a road hockey game in your driveway, it’s essential to find a hockey stick that best suits your needs. This process goes beyond selecting a twig that looks cool, as you’ll want to consider the size, weight, flex, handedness, and a variety of other factors.

After all, if you end up with a stick that isn’t the right size or is the wrong hand, you’ll struggle to perform at a high level.

The good news is that although there are many different options available, it just takes a little bit of knowledge to narrow your search considerably.

Playing Surface

Before all else, you’ll want to ensure you’re buying a stick for the correct playing surface. If you’ll be playing ice hockey, an ice hockey stick is an essential piece of equipment. Likewise, when playing street or roller hockey, grabbing a stick with that surface in mind is a good idea.

Keep in mind that while you can use an ice hockey stick on other surfaces, a composite or wood blade will likely damage quickly on the pavement. Likewise, a street hockey stick isn’t designed with the puck’s weight in mind and will break. Generally, street hockey games use a ball, making sticks with plastic blades more acceptable because of the reduced weight. Plastic blades are also resistant to wearing down on the pavement.

Handedness

Buying a stick with the proper handedness is essential; if you make a mistake here, the product becomes virtually unusable. All sticks come with a right-handed or left-handed curve. The curve helps you elevate the puck when taking a shot and also cradles it as you stick-handle.

The stick’s handedness is determined by where your hands go when you pick it up. The gist is that the hand that’s closest to the stick’s blade when taking a shot defines your handedness.

If your left hand goes at the top of the stick and your right hand in the middle, you’ll need a right-handed product. Those who place their right hand at the top and their left hand at the midpoint require a left-handed stick.

You’ll generally want your dominant hand at the top of the stick because it provides you with better control over it. This configuration might seem counter-intuitive because it’s the opposite of holding a baseball bat or golf club, but it’ll help your game if you can get used to it.

Material

The stick’s material is essential to your decision because it determines its weight, flexibility, and durability.

Throughout most of history, hockey players used wood sticks. These sticks are usually pretty heavy and don’t provide much flex when getting a shot off.

Then, the industry switched to aluminum, which is lighter than wood and provides added durability.

Today, the majority of sticks are made from a composite material containing carbon fiber. These sticks used to break easily when manufacturers first introduced them, but today they’re as durable as, if not more durable than, wood.

You’ll see some sticks with plastic blades, too, which are strictly for street or ball hockey.

Size

Hockey sticks come in a few different sizes, and you’ll make your selection based on the player’s height.

Senior sticks usually have a shaft length between 57 and 63 inches and are made for adult players. These shafts are also thicker than children’s sticks. Smaller adults can cut the shaft to the right height or go with an intermediate version.

Intermediate sticks are for young players between the ages of 11 and 14 and have shaft lengths of 55-58 inches. For players between the ages of 7 and 13, junior sticks, which are between 50 and 54 inches, are usually the best choice. Those between three and eight will go with a youth stick, which is between 38 and 49 inches long.

You might come across some goalie sticks during your search, too. These sticks have a thicker bottom portion of the shaft called a paddle, which helps the goalie make saves. It’s worth noting that you can’t use a goalie stick when playing forward or defense because it’s too large and bulky.

Weight

The stick’s weight is a vital factor to consider because lighter sticks are easier to control. Composite sticks are the lightest on the market, which is one reason why they’re the most expensive. The composite STX Ice Hockey Surgeon RX3, for example, weighs less than 15 ounces, while the wooden Mylec MK1 weighs about 24 ounces.

Flex

When you watch an experienced hockey player shoot the puck, you might notice a fair amount of flex in the stick. The shooter will lean on the twig to get it to bend. Then, as the stick straightens back out, energy is transferred through it and to the puck, creating a harder shot.

High-end sticks will have a flex rating on them, with lower numbers being easier to flex than higher ones. The stick’s flex number represents how many pounds of force it takes to create one-inch of flex.

However, one caveat is that the more a stick flexes, the harder the shot is to control. As a result, players usually choose a flex profile based on their size and strength, so they don’t end up with a stick with too much whip.

Senior sticks generally come with flex ratings of between 75 and 120. Most adult players use an 85, 90, or 95, although smaller players might opt for a 75, and extremely large adults might go for a 120. Intermediate sticks have flex ratings of between 60 and 70, junior sticks are 50-55, and youth sticks range from 35 to 45.

Keep in mind that the flex rating only applies to composite sticks, as wooden ones don’t have the same amount of give to them.

Making a Decision

Remember, your stick won’t automatically turn you into an elite goalscorer, as you’ll need a lot of practice before you’re picking corners like a pro. At the same time, buying a hockey stick that doesn’t fit you properly or is for the wrong type of hockey is a recipe for disaster. At best, you end up looking silly; at worst, you break your stick or hurt yourself.

Carefully consider these factors as you review our product list so that you end up with the right stick for your hockey needs.

Top 10 Best Hockey Sticks 2021

1. Best Overall Stick: STX Ice Hockey Surgeon RX3.2

Why we like it: The STX Ice Hockey Surgeon RX3.2 is a lightweight composite stick and a top choice for the recreational ice hockey player.

Editor’s Rating:

Quick Facts:

  • Playing Surface: Ice
  • Size: Senior, intermediate, and junior
  • Material: Carbon fiber

For recreational ice hockey players who don’t want to break the bank, very few options beat the STX Ice Hockey Surgeon RX3.2. This stick has a durable carbon fiber construction and weighs just 18 ounces, making it a durable and easy-to-use choice. Keep in mind that while this stick is excellent for rec-league play, it doesn’t have the high-end features you’d want when playing ultra-competitively.

Key Features

The STX Ice Hockey Surgeon RX3.2 is an attractive twig with black, blue, and white graphics. It features an ergonomic design that makes it easy to hold, and its dual kick point ensures it’s perfect for all shooting styles. The stick has three different blade pattern options and five flex profiles for youth, intermediate, and senior players. There are some durability concerns with the product, but it’s hard to beat this option for the price.

Verdict

Despite its modest price point, the STX Ice Hockey Surgeon RX3.2 has everything a recreational hockey player needs, including a reinforced blade and multiple flex options. The stick is light enough that it’ll never be cumbersome, and its attractive graphics stand out on the ice. This product isn’t a pro-level stick, and it might not last if you’re using it in a competitive league, but if you’re just playing for fun, this is an option worth considering.

Pros
  • Inexpensive for a composite
  • Lightweight
  • Attractive graphics
Cons
  • Not for competitive ice hockey
  • Lacks the durability of a high-end stick

2. Best Premium Stick: STX Ice Hockey Surgeon RX3

Why we like it: The STX Ice Hockey Surgeon RX3 is a high-end stick and similar to what professional players use all over the world.

Editor’s Rating:

Quick Facts:

  • Playing Surface: Ice
  • Size: Senior, intermediate, junior, youth
  • Material: Carbon fiber

The STX Ice Hockey Surgeon RX3 is very similar to the STX Ice Hockey Surgeon RX3.2, except it’s lighter, more durable, and comes with added features like its high-performance Pureblade. All of this comes together to create a pro-level stick that weighs just over 14 ounces and provides one of the best playing experiences on the market. The catch is that the stick is about three times the price of the RX3.2, so it isn’t the best option for rec-league players, and its blade wears down rapidly during street hockey games.

Key Features

The STX Ice Hockey Surgeon RX3 has everything the serious player could ever want from a stick. It offers four different blade patterns and six flex profiles, giving you all kinds of options. The unit’s Precision Flex II technology allows you to transfer energy to the puck quickly, and it has a dual kick point and high balance point, as well, adding to its playability.

Verdict

The STX Ice Hockey Surgeon RX3 is good enough for pro players, so it’s undoubtedly usable in your league. Even if you’re only playing pickup games with friends, this lightweight stick will help with your performance. Yes, the stick is expensive, but you get what you pay for when you go with this outstanding option from STX Hockey.

Pros
  • Tons of flex and blade pattern options
  • Extremely lightweight
  • Lots of additional features
Cons
  • Expensive
  • The blade will wear down when used for street hockey

3. Best Budget Stick: Mylec MK1

Why we like it: The Mylec MK1 is an inexpensive yet durable product that works best as a street hockey stick but can be used on the ice, too.

Editor’s Rating:

Quick Facts:

  • Playing Surface: Ice or street
  • Size: Senior
  • Material: Wood with a fiberglass-coated blade

One of the great things about the Mylec MK1 is its appearance, as it has modern-looking graphics like a composite stick. The result is an attractive product that looks far sleeker than other wooden sticks, despite its low price point. Overall, this item is adaptable and durable for most non-competitive hockey players, although you might find it a bit heavy when using it regularly.

Key Features

You can employ the Mylec MK1 on both the ice and pavement, making it incredibly versatile. Although it won’t stand up to the abuse of a competitive game of ice hockey, it’s usable during a shinny match with friends. It’s durable as a street hockey stick, though, and its reinforced fiberglass blade won’t wear down quickly when dragging on the road. This item is an excellent and affordable option for a quick game of pickup or regular use in your driveway.

Verdict

Before buying the Mylec MK1, it’s essential to set expectations. As long as you aren’t expecting a pro-level stick like the STX Ice Hockey Surgeon RX3, you should be happy with this stick’s durability and price point. This item isn’t a high-end stick, but it gets the job done if you’re looking for an affordable twig for the odd friendly game or playing in your driveway.

Pros
  • Inexpensive
  • Reinforced blade for use on pavement
  • Attractive color pattern
Cons
  • Heavier than composite
  • Not durable on the ice

4. Best Street Stick: Franklin Sports Power X Street Hockey Stick

Why we like it: The Franklin Sports Power X Street Hockey Stick is a high-end product that provides good performance when playing road or ball hockey.

Editor’s Rating:

Quick Facts:

  • Playing Surface: Street
  • Size: Senior, junior, youth
  • Material: Wood shaft with a plastic blade

For a pure road hockey stick, it’s tough to beat the Franklin Sports Power X Street Hockey Stick. Unlike the Mylec MK1, which you can use on multiple surfaces, this product’s plastic blade can’t handle the weight of the puck. Instead, the stick is designed for use with a ball during a game of street hockey. Still, this stick is an inexpensive option if you’ll be playing in your driveway or meeting up with friends at a local outdoor rink for a quick game and don’t want to sacrifice your expensive composite blade.

Key Features

The Franklin Sports Power X Street Hockey Stick has a plastic blade that you can curve to your liking. This feature makes it possible to customize your stick once it arrives. The item also has a multi-ply wood shaft, which gives it some flex. While it isn’t as flexible as a composite stick, it has enough give to improve your shot’s velocity. This stick is well-balanced, so you won’t feel like any section is heavier than the others, but it’s bulky compared to the STX Ice Hockey Surgeon RX3.2.

Verdict

The Franklin Sports Power X Street Hockey Stick is an inexpensive road hockey stick that’s good for using in a quick game of pickup when you don’t want to ruin one of your high-end blades on the pavement. There are some durability concerns with its plastic blade, as it can chip or break in a serious game, and the stick is quite heavy, but when you don’t want to spend much money or sacrifice all your shot power, this product is worth considering.

Pros
  • Inexpensive
  • Great for road hockey
  • A fair amount of flex
Cons
  • Blade can chip
  • Pretty heavy

5. Best Kids’ Stick: Franklin Sports NHL SX Comp 1010 Street Tech Hockey Stick

Why we like it: The Franklin Sports NHL SX Comp 1010 Street Tech Hockey Stick is a durable product for kids’ street hockey games.

Editor’s Rating:

Quick Facts:

  • Playing Surface: Street
  • Size: Junior, youth
  • Material: Wood with a plastic blade

You probably won’t want to spend too much on a kids’ road hockey stick, which makes the Franklin Sports NHL SX Comp 1010 Street Tech Hockey Stick a solid choice. This product has a wood shaft and a plastic blade that you can curve yourself, ensuring your child ends up with a product that’s comfortable to use. It’s also extremely durable, although it isn’t for use in competitive games or with pucks. The stick only comes in kids’ sizes, as well.

Key Features

Kids tend to wear hockey sticks out quickly, especially when playing on the road or driveway daily. This stick has a removable blade that you can replace with a new one, so you won’t have to purchase an entirely new twig when this happens like with the Mylec 57-Inch Ultra Curve Air Flo Pro Stick. The blade that comes with this stick is also very durable, so the product should last your kids until they grow out of it.

Verdict

You can’t go wrong with this product if you’re searching for an inexpensive road hockey stick for your child. The blade is durable and replaceable, which is excellent news for parents who are regularly replacing their children’s sports equipment. This stick is heavier than a composite and will break quickly if your child tries to shoot pucks, but the Franklin Sports NHL SX Comp 1010 Street Tech Hockey Stick is a great choice when used in its intended way.

Pros
  • Very durable
  • Inexpensive
  • Removable blade
Cons
  • Not for use with pucks
  • A bit heavy

6. Best Replaceable Blade: Mylec Eclipse Jet Flo Stick

Why we like it: The Mylec Eclipse Jet Flo Stick features a replaceable blade and is durable for kids playing street hockey.

Editor’s Rating:

Quick Facts:

  • Playing Surface: Street
  • Size: Youth
  • Material: Wood with a plastic blade

The Mylec Eclipse Jet Flo Stick isn’t a high-end stick by any stretch, but it features a sturdy plastic blade that you can replace as it wears down, making it a good alternative for kids who want to play street hockey with friends. There are issues with the blade attachment, though, as the screws tend to eat away at the plastic, causing it to crack. The stick also gives off splinters, so young kids will want to buy a good pair of hockey gloves to wear while using it.

Key Features

The Mylec Eclipse Jet Flo Stick isn’t for competitive use, but it’s an acceptable option as an inexpensive stick for driveway games. The product features a sturdy blade that won’t break down after being dragged on the pavement, making it a solid choice for kids. It’s very basic but gets the job done if your kids don’t need anything special from their hockey sticks.

Verdict

If you can get past the blade attachment issues and the splinters, both of which you can fix by wrapping sections of the stick with hockey tape, the Mylec Eclipse Jet Flo Stick is an affordable product that will get the job done. This item’s construction will withstand a child playing with it roughly in the driveway, so you won’t have to worry about replacing the shaft anytime soon, and replacement blades only cost a few dollars if you need one.

Pros
  • Inexpensive
  • Replaceable blade
  • Durable construction
Cons
  • Issues with the blade attachment
  • The wood splinters

7. Best Reinforced Blade: Mylec 57-Inch Ultra Curve Air Flo Pro Stick

Why we like it: Unlike other street hockey sticks, the Mylec 57-Inch Ultra Curve Air Flo Pro Stick has a reinforced fiberglass blade that makes it more durable.

Editor’s Rating:

Quick Facts:

  • Playing Surface: Street
  • Size: Senior
  • Material: Wood with a plastic, fiberglass reinforced blade

The Mylec 57-Inch Ultra Curve Air Flo Pro Stick is an excellent option for adults who want to play some road hockey. The blade plastic blade is reinforced with fiberglass, much like the Frontier 5000 Senior Hockey Stick, making it far more robust than other street hockey blades and ensuring it doesn’t break quickly. The stick also has a pleasant appearance that looks similar to a composite stick because of its laminated finish.

One drawback is that while the blade is durable, it’ll still wear down over time and isn’t replaceable like some other plastic blades. The blade also tends to separate from the wood shaft because it’s only attached with glue.

Key Features

The Mylec 57-Inch Ultra Curve Air Flo Pro Stick has everything you could want from a street hockey stick, particularly if you aren’t interested in spending too much money. The blade is slightly different from others on the market, as it isn’t flimsy like other plastic blades. The result is a feel that’s closer to a high-end stick than you might expect from a plastic blade. However, you’ll notice that it’s far heavier than a composite, especially after spending a few hours playing.

Verdict

If you’re looking to play in your driveway with your kids or get together with some friends for a quick outdoor game, the Mylec 57-Inch Ultra Curve Air Flo Pro Stick is a solid choice. Despite its sleek appearance, you’ll never mistake this product for a pro-level stick when playing with it, but its durability ensures you’ll get your money’s worth.

Pros
  • Durable blade
  • Looks great
  • Inexpensive
Cons
  • Heavy
  • Blade and shaft can separate
  • Can’t replace the blade

8. Best Goalie Stick: Mylec Air Flo Goalie Stick

Why we like it: The Mylec Air Flo Goalie Stick ensures that anyone who’s playing goal during a street hockey game has an easier time stopping the puck.

Editor’s Rating:

Quick Facts:

  • Playing Surface: Street
  • Size: Junior
  • Material: Wood with a plastic paddle

Playing goal is challenging at the best of times, and it becomes even more difficult without the proper equipment. Luckily, there are inexpensive options like the Mylec Air Flo Goalie Stick on the market for young goalies playing street hockey. This stick is durable, thanks to its robust plastic blade, so it won’t break when stopping shots. Unfortunately, there isn’t a curve on the blade, making it more challenging to handle the ball, and it might be too heavy for young kids.

Key Features

One of the first things you’ll notice about the Mylec Air Flo Goalie Stick is its appearance, as the item looks great. The plastic blade stands out, and the shaft looks just like the pros, which is essential for young players. The stick’s paddle won’t break as your child stops shots, and the product should last for years because of its durable construction.

Verdict

Overall, the Mylec Air Flo Goalie Stick is a fine choice for playing hockey in the driveway with friends. This stick isn’t for ice hockey, and it’s a bit heavy for really young kids, but you can’t go wrong for the price. Having a goal stick simplifies the position, and this product’s price point makes it an excellent option.

Pros
  • Strong and durable
  • Good value
  • Attractive stick
Cons
  • Too heavy for some kids
  • No curve on blade

9. Best Intermediate Stick: Arsenal Envy Carbon Fiber Ice Hockey Stick

Why we like it: The Arsenal Envy Carbon Fiber Ice Hockey Stick offers high-quality carbon composite construction at an affordable price point.

Editor’s Rating:

Quick Facts:

  • Playing Surface: Ice
  • Size: Senior, intermediate
  • Material: Carbon fiber

While many carbon composite sticks can run you hundreds of dollars, the Arsenal Envy Carbon Fiber Ice Hockey Stick comes in at under $100 in both the intermediate and senior sizes, making it an option for players of all skill levels to consider. The stick is well-balanced, providing a good feel on the ice, and is durable enough that young players can get an entire season from it.

Keep in mind that the stick is heavier than options you might buy from more well-known manufacturers, such as the STX Ice Hockey Surgeon RX3.2, which could be an issue for some players.

Key Features

When looking at the Arsenal Envy Carbon Fiber Ice Hockey Stick, you’ll notice the intermediate version comes in a 65 flex and is available with both grip and matte finishes, providing multiple options for young players. One issue is that it only has one blade pattern, a mid-toe curve with an open face, so you might have to look elsewhere if you have a strong preference for something else.

Verdict

As far as intermediate composite twigs go, the Arsenal Envy Carbon Fiber Ice Hockey Stick is a decent option at an affordable price point. The stick is heavy but durable and well-balanced. Overall, the product provides outstanding value and is worth checking out if the young player in your life is in the market for a new stick.

Pros
  • Excellent value for a composite stick
  • Balanced weight distribution
  • Solid durability
Cons
  • Heavier than many composite sticks
  • Only one blade pattern

10. Best Wood Stick: Frontier 5000 Senior Hockey Stick

Why we like it: The Frontier 5000 Senior Hockey Stick is made from wood but has some features that mimic an expensive composite stick’s feel.

Editor’s Rating:

Quick Facts:

  • Playing Surface: Ice or street
  • Size: Senior
  • Material: Wood with a fiberglass-coated blade

Retro is fashionable in the hockey world, with many pro teams switching to 70s and 80s style jerseys and goalies using equipment with throwback appearance but modern functionality. The Frontier 5000 Senior Hockey Stick falls into this category, as it has an old-school look that’s similar to what players used in the 1980s. At the same time, the stick’s fiberglass-reinforced blade and 14-ply birch shaft are lighter than anything used in that period.

Key Features

While this isn’t a pro-level option, the Frontier 5000 Senior Hockey Stick has a pretty good feel for a wood stick, and its fiberglass-reinforced blade will stand up to all kinds of abuse. The product provides a decent amount of flex for a wood stick, too, although it sacrifices some durability in the shaft because of this added whip. The product is also surprisingly lightweight. Unfortunately, the item doesn’t have any blade pattern options, and it’s only available in the senior length, limiting the product’s versatility.

Verdict

Overall, it seems as though the Frontier 5000 Senior Hockey Stick attempts to create some of the benefits of a composite stick, as it’s light and flexible while maintaining its wood construction. The product does sacrifice some durability, but that allows for better performance from an inexpensive stick. The stick is only available with a standard blade pattern and in the senior size, limiting its usability for some.

Pros
  • Durable blade
  • Light for a wood stick
  • Good flex
Cons
  • Flimsy shaft
  • Only comes in senior size
  • Single blade pattern

The Complete Guide to Buying the Best Hockey Stick

hockey sticks in a hallway

There’s a lot to take in when buying a hockey stick, especially if you’re a beginner. For starters, you’ll need the right product to match the type of hockey you’re playing since a road hockey stick with a plastic blade doesn’t have the blade strength to shoot pucks.

Luckily, all it takes is a little research to ensure you end up with the right hockey stick to meet your needs.

Choosing the Right Stick

A significant part of choosing a hockey stick comes down to personal preference. Even pro players can struggle using a twig that doesn’t meet their specifications or feel comfortable in their hands.

You probably won’t want to spend too much on a stick before learning about the various technologies and what they mean for your game, either.

However, lighter sticks are always more comfortable to use, and you’ll want to ensure you go with a durable product so that it lasts more than a few games. Few things are more frustrating for a hockey player than buying a new stick and having it break one of the first times you take a shot.

How Long a Stick Lasts

There’s no set time on how long a stick should last, as a lot of it comes down to chance. If you’re playing a game and an opposing player slashes your stick, there’s a chance it could break. This incident could occur during your first shift or after using the same stick for years.

However, one thing to consider is the pop in the stick’s shaft. Since a composite stick flexes every time you take a shot and then returns to its original shape, the material experiences a significant amount of strain. Over time, the strands that make up the stick’s shaft can stretch and weaken. The result is less pop on your shots and decreased durability.

Rec-league players should get a season or two out of a good stick, though, while competitive players can expect to go through a few sticks per year. Some pro players even use a new stick every game. It all depends on how hard you are on your twig.

Selecting a Blade Pattern

You might have noticed that some sticks give you blade pattern options. Many beginners make the mistake of going with the stick with the largest curve. While this might seem like it would improve your shot, it actually makes it less predictable and more difficult to control.

The blade pattern is defined by the type of curve. There are three curve types: heel, mid, and toe.

Defensemen typically use heel curves because they’re good for powerful, accurate shots but not as good for controlling the puck. A toe curve is better for lifting the puck quickly and shooting in tight spaces, while a mid curve is best for stick-handlers and passers.

There are various options within each broad category that will alter the stick’s performance. It’s best to play around with a cheaper stick when getting started, at least while you determine where you spend most of your time on the ice.

If you find yourself in front of your opponent’s net a lot, a toe curve is a good choice. Those who frequently defend near their own net might prefer a heel curve, while those that always have the puck on their sticks through the neutral zone would benefit from a mid curve.

What’s a Kick Point?

High-end sticks mention a kick point in their descriptions, but what does this mean?

The gist is that the kick point is where the stick is meant to flex when you’re taking a shot. A mid-kick stick will bend in the middle, while a low-kick stick will flex closer to the blade.

The kick point matters because it changes how the stick performs. A mid-kick stick creates a more powerful shot. That’s because the entire middle of the stick flexes, creating a greater energy transfer between the stick and the puck.

A low-kick stick flexes closer to the blade. You’ll sacrifice some power when going with this option, but you’ll also get your shot off faster.

The kick-point you select depends on your style of play. If you prefer to take slapshots or load your stick up for heavy wrist shots, a mid-kick stick is your best option. Likewise, if you prefer quick snapshots or playing close to the net, a low-kick stick will get the job done for you.

There are variable-kicks on the market now, too. When using these sticks, the kick point changes based on your hand placement.

Finding the Right Height

You’ll notice that sticks come in different lengths, so you’ll want to select your product based on your height. However, it’s important to factor your playing surface into your decision. That’s because skates give you a couple of extra inches of height.

Generally, you’ll want a stick that reaches somewhere between the top of your nose and the bottom of your chin when it’s standing upright. Some players prefer a shorter twig because it makes it easier to control the puck, while others like a long shaft due to the extra reach it provides. Once again, the choice is up to you and your personal preferences.

Pro Tip: You can cut a stick that’s too long to shorten it, so it’s better to buy a twig that’s too big than too small.

Grip Sticks

Some composite sticks come with a sticky film on them, which helps keep your hands in place while taking a shot or stick-handling. This substance has a similar effect to pine tar on a baseball bat, except it’s a permanent feature that lasts as long as the stick.

The other option is a matte finish on the stick. This option creates a smoother product that can be a little harder to hold onto but makes it easier to slide your hands up and down the shaft.

The stick you choose comes down to personal preference. Some players appreciate how the grip finish prevents their hands from slipping, while others prefer a matte stick’s feel. The choice is up to you. Keep in mind that these options don’t apply to wood sticks, which provide natural grip because of the material’s abrasiveness.

Taping Your Stick

You’ll want to tape your stick before using it because it provides a little additional grip and makes it easier to handle and shoot the puck. The way you tape your blade and shaft depends on what you’re comfortable with and the type of stick you’re using.

No matter what type of stick you buy, you’ll want to tape the knob, the area at the top of the item where your non-dominant hand goes. The tape provides a little extra grip, preventing your hand from slipping off while shooting.

When playing ice hockey, you’ll also want to tape your stick’s blade. This tape provides a little cushioning, making it easier to control the puck. It also creates some friction when shooting, putting a spin on the puck, and making it more challenging for the goalie to stop. Remember that you won’t want to tape your stick’s blade when playing street hockey because the tape will rip from the bottom and stick to the pavement.

However, you might tape the top part of your removable blade where it meets the shaft on a road hockey stick. This tape can prevent the blade from flying off if the attaching screws give-out and can ensure the screws don’t scratch opposing players during your game.

Wrapping Up

Personal preference forms a significant part of selecting the perfect hockey stick, and the type of hockey you’ll be playing is also an essential factor. In the end, you’ll likely want to grab a durable product that performs well for you in your given playing environment. Go with a composite or wood stick when playing ice hockey and a street hockey stick when playing on the pavement to ensure your stick maximizes your ability the next time you play.

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